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OET-RV by cross-referenced section MARK Intro:14

MARK Intro:14–Intro:32 ©

This is still a very early look into the unfinished text of the Open English Translation of the Bible. Please double-check the text in advance before using in public.

Introduction

Mark Intro:14–32

Yhn Intro:14–32

Mat Intro:14–32

Luke Intro:14–32

Introduction

Author

This account about the works and teachings of Yeshua was written by Mark, the son of a Jewish family who lived in Yerusalem. His mother was named Maria (Acts 12:12).

Many people think he was Yohan Mark, a cousin of Barnabas (Col. 4:10) who accompanied Paul on his first long-distance trip to spread the good message about Yeshua the messiah (Acts 12:25, 13:13). We also know that Mark accompanied Peter (1 Peter 5:13), and some consider that it might have been Peter who narrated to Mark what Yeshua had done and taught.

This account

This account seems to have been written for non-Jews, especially perhaps those familiar with Roman customs. So he didn’t use as much ink as Matthew or Luke explaining prophecies from the Jewish scriptures but he does however, take time to explain Jewish customs to help non-Jewish readers.

Mark explains here that Yeshua came to serve both God and the people, and he often refers to him as ‘humanity’s child’ (traditionally translated very literally from the Greek as the ‘Son of Man’). We can see that especially in 10:45: “Even humanity’s child didn’t come to be served, but to serve others and to give his life as a ransom to set many people free.” Mark wants his readers to know that Yeshua did incredible things, but especially focuses on his teaching. He confirms the power and authority of Yeshua by telling about the miracles that he did, his healing of the sick, and his exorcism of demons.

The ending of this account is often disputed, and scholars are still debating about whether or not the longer ending (16:9-20) is original. The OET includes the disputed longer ending, but displays it in a lighter colour to indicate its debatable status.

Main components of Mark’s account

Preparation for and arrival of the messiah 1:1-13

Yeshua’s activities in and around Galilee 1:14-9:50

The transition from Galilee to Yerusalem 10:1-52

The final week in Yerusalem 11:1-15:47

Yeshua comes back to life 16:1-20

This is still a very early look into the unfinished text of the Open English Translation of the Bible. Please double-check the text in advance before using in public.

Introduction

Author

This account about the works and teachings of Yeshua (Jesus) was written by Yohan, brother of Yacob (mistakenly known in older English Bibles as James). Both of them were in the small group of twelve close followers of Yeshua that he selected as his apprentices and who accompanied him around as he taught. Out of the twelve, Yohan was the one that greatly loved Yeshua, and his closeness gave him much of the insight that he includes with his description of Yeshua’s actions and teaching. The two brothers were the sons of Zebedee, and all three of them worked on Lake Galilee as fishermen.

This account

The Open English Translation places Yohan’s account before the others because it begins with the eternal existence of Yeshua the messiah. Not only is Yeshua the godly messenger, he was also the creator who has now descended from heaven as a man. Omitting any mention of the baby Yeshua, Yohan does however tell us about Yohan-the-Immerser who came before Yeshua to prepare the people for the arrival of the promised messiah.

In chapters two to twelve it’s written how the various miracles that Yeshua did showed that he was the promised messiah who would offer life without ending to anyone who would accept that he had been sent by God and trust in his teaching. Although there were indeed many who did believe in him, many others were unable to come to that point and ended up opposing Yeshua at every turn.

In chapters thirteen to seventeen, the compassion of Yeshua towards his followers is described. He also told them in advance of his impending brutal death.

In the final few chapters, we read about the arrest and judging of Yeshua, his being fastened to a pole and giving up his spirit, his coming back to life, and how his followers saw him and spoke with him again during that period.

Yohan is careful to explain how to receive life without ending by means of believing that Yeshua came down from heaven and obeying his teaching. Yeshua himself is the path and the truth and the life (14:6).

Main components of Yohan’s account

Introduction 1:1-18

Yohan-the-Immerser and the first followers of Yeshua 1:19-51

The people monitor Yeshua’s teaching and miracles 2:1-12:50

Yeshua’s final week in and around Yerusalem 13:1-19:42

Yeshua comes back to life and meets people again 20:1-31

Yeshua reveals himself to his followers in Galilee 21:1-25

This is still a very early look into the unfinished text of the Open English Translation of the Bible. Please double-check the text in advance before using in public.

Introduction

Author

The writer of this document was Matthaios, known in English as Matthew and in Hebrew as Levi. He was one of the twelve apprentices of Yeshua, and named by Alphaeus his father. He was from Galilee but worked in Capernaum as a tax-collector before he left that to follow Yeshua. It’s possible that it was Yeshua who changed his name from Levi when he became a follower, and named him Matthew which means ‘the gift of God’ in Hebrew.

This account

Matthew’s account starts by listing the ancestors of Yeshua, and then describes his birth, his immersion in water, and his temptation by the devil. He tells us about a lot of his preaching and teaching, and about how he healed many sick people in the Galilee region. After that, Matthew goes on to describe Yeshua’s trip to Yerusalem and what happened to him there. Then he explains what happened in Yeshua’s final week in Yerusalem, his execution on a stake, and his coming back to life.

This document tells how Yeshua is the messiah, promised by God to save the Jews, and all non-Jews who place their trust in him. So by means of him, God fulfills his promises to his people that were listed in the Old Testament.

This good message reveals Yeshua as the great teacher to explain God’s law. Here in this document, Matthew records five lengthy teaching sessions about God’s kingdom: (1) The preaching on the hill about people’s behaviour, their responsibilities, and what they might expect to receive in God’s kingdom (chapters 5–7); (2) warning the twelve apprentices about their works (chapter 10); (3) the parables about God’s kingdom (chapter 13); (4) the teaching concerning the way to become a follower (chapter 18); and (5) the teaching concerning the end of this age and God’s kingdom which is coming. (chapters 24–25).

Main components of Matthew’s account

The ancestors and the birth of Yeshua the messiah 1:1-2:23

The work of Yohan-the-Immerser 3:1-12

The immersion and the temptation of Yeshua 3:13-4:11

The work and teaching of Yeshua in Galilee 4:12-18:35

Yeshua’s trip from Galilee to Yerusalem 19:1-20:34

Yeshua’s final week in Yerusalem 21:1-27:66

Yeshua comes back to life 28:1-20

This is still a very early look into the unfinished text of the Open English Translation of the Bible. Please double-check the text in advance before using in public.

Introduction

Author

This account about the works and teachings of Yeshua was written by Luke, one of the later followers of Yeshua. Luke was believed to be a medical doctor and although many have assumed him to be a Greek, there’s also a good case that he was Jewish. He was good friends with Paul and accompanied him several times as they travelled to various places to spread the good message about Yeshua the messiah. Luke was also the author of the account of the beginnings of the Christian church known commonly known as Acts, and unlike most other Bibles, the Open English Translation places these two successive accounts one after the other.

This account

This account was written to Theophilus who is said to be an honoured person from Rome. He starts his account with the prophesied birth of Yohan-the-Immerser and then of Yeshua right through until he’s lifted into the clouds. Luke also explains how that Yeshua is the messiah promised by God to save Jews and all non-Jews who put their trust in him.

It’s also told here in this document about Yeshua’s mercy towards troubled people and sinners, his healing din of many who were sick or possessed by demons, his bringing dead people back to life, and his teaching. Recurring themes here include God’s spirit, prayer, forgiveness of sins, the women who helped Yeshua with his work, and how believers should prepare for his return.

Main components of Luke’s first account

Introduction 1:1-4

The birth and childhood of Yohan-the-Immerser and of Yeshua 1:5-2:52

The ministry of Yohan-the-Immerser 3:1-20

The immersion and testing of Yeshua 3:21-4:13

Yeshua’s ministry up in Galilee 4:14-9:50

Moving from Galilee towards Yerusalem 9:51-19:27

The final week in and near Yerusalem 19:28-23:56

The resurrection, appearances, and exit of Yeshua 24:1-53

This is still a very early look into the unfinished text of the Open English Translation of the Bible. Please double-check the text in advance before using in public.